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Author Topic: Are the names of movements important?  (Read 1898 times)

Admin

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Are the names of movements important?
« on: April 07, 2013, 01:10:03 PM »
Sun 7 Apr 2013, 8:04 pm

Hello All,

I notice that that movements have different names depending, I guess, on the teacher or school which teaches them.  For example, In Shibashi 1st Set, Movement 3 is called "Painting the Rainbow" by one teacher and "The Ribbon Dance" by another

Am I assuming correctly, then, that these names are only important aids to make it easier to remember the movements?  

Aloha,

Rex

Fabrice

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Re: Are the names of movements important?
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2014, 04:23:02 AM »
Hi Rex and all

The original names as selected by prof. Lin Housheng give some very important point about the movement itself.

The problem with the translation into English is the interpretation made by people who don't fully understand the movement and see the name as simply poetic.

To take your example of set 1 movement 3, the proper translation would be "waving the rainbow" with the idea of waiving a flag. The meditative image suggested by prof. Lin is that you are dancing with/inside a rainbow. Feeling the color and the joy of touching a rainbow, like every kids who wish to find its origin and touch it...

Hope this helps...

Fabrice

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Re: Are the names of movements important?
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2014, 03:31:08 AM »
Mon 25 Aug 2014, 10:24 am

Hey Fabrice!

Long time no see!  Welcome back!

Thanks for your post.  It is unfortunate that translating between Chinese and English can be so challenging.  Add to that the fact that these are ancient disciplines which have evolved into various branches and various interpretations over centuries and you get a lot of confusion.  That is one of the things websites such as ours can do, help get the word out and clarify any confusion.  The nice thing about Shibashi as opposed to TaiChi, such as Yang Form, is that it is possible to learn from home with videos. That is one of the objectives of Mind-Body Thailand, to point people to online sources where they can learn about Mind-Body disciplines, et al if it is difficult for them to find classes and teachers "on the ground."

For example, I had been referring to Shibashi as "TaiChi," and it took a couple of years to figure out that it is more properly a flowing form of QiGong with some TaiChi forms.   I also understand that while this is important and interesting to me, it probably sounds like a lot of jibber-jabber to newbies.

Nice to see you again, Fabrice.  Please come back often and feel free to post videos and talk about Prof. Lin  and what your school is doing in Canada and around the world.

We are moving to a new host, probably tonight.  I hope we will only have 24 hours or less of down time, but if you get error messages, don't panic, just try again in 12 hours.

Aloha,

Rex